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promouvoir l'œuvre de Itsuo Tsuda

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en:calligraphies [2012/03/08 08:36]
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en:calligraphies [2012/03/09 17:04] (Version actuelle)
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-It was mainly in the month of May that Itsuo Tsuda used to do his calligraphies. When people asked him why he did them in May, he would say:  « it's springtime! » 
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-He had already done calligraphy in Japan. When he arrived in Europe, he drew a few things, but the paper he found wasn't appropriate, so, he would write rather than do calligraphy. Then he had the desire to convey something through calligraphy. 
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-He always said his calligraphies were « amateur calligraphy ». In Japan, this is not the calligraphy-that-amateurs-do, but the calligraphy done by zen masters for example, or by ikebana, or sword masters ... they pass on a message through these calligraphies. 
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-It was so with Master Ueshiba's calligraphies. Significantly, he would sign them a different name. So, calligraphy, for Master Tsuda, was the handing down of his teaching through something he wrote with the brush, it was the transmission of something. 
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-He started writing on rice paper, but as he said, this paper is very fragile : unless a  glued backing is applied to it, it gets damaged very quickly... unfortunately in France in the seventies, he couln't find any professional of this kind of work. That's why he decided to use the technique of batik, and he kept on using it from this time on for most of the calligraphies he did. 
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-So, in the month of May, he would get ready, so to speak, and he wrote his calligraphies. 
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-And he did some every year, for a certain number of years. He didn't do many each year, maybe about twenty, not more. 
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-However, Master Tsuda didn't use the technique of batik in the usual way :   
-normally, one fills in a part very carefully and then the material is dyed... he used to dip his calligraphy brush into hot wax and had to manage to write before the wax dried. This in order to preserve the act of writing with the brush that you find in traditional calligraphy : one prepares the ink and then one writes. It is one single gesture, with no interruption. 
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-When he explained his technique, he said it was very difficult so at the beginning he had  failed lots of times.Yet it was the only method he had found to be able, in a western country, to leave a trace of this art. 
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-Master Tsuda would dye the fabric himself, generally either in a shade of blue I would call « Japanese blue », or in a sort of brown-red, or else in a dark blue. He used those three colours only, choosing one of them each year - why did he use this colour one year and that one another year? That, he never explained - then, he removed the wax using an iron and blotting paper. Then the calligraphy was ready.